How Long Do Sparrows Live

4 Comments

  1. The reason people in the US kill sparrows is not just because they’re a nuisance. In fact, that has very little to do with it.

    It’s because they’re invasive and kill the native birds. They regularly kill bluebirds, tree swallows, chickadees and house wrens (both adults and babies).

    Those in the US who monitor nest trails, have been heartbroken to discover the native species kills by sparrows. I recently had to euthanize a baby bird that was attacked by a sparrow because the injuries were too severe and it would not survive in the wild.

    Sadly, adding more nest boxes will not appease house sparrows. European starlings are also a problem in the US.

    I love birds too, but in an effort of conservation, US conservationists will euthanize house sparrows and European starlings. And they absolutely must because they have led to a decline in the native bird population in the US.

    There are some who might argue to “let nature take its course,” and “survival of the fittest.” The trouble is, when it comes to invasive birds, nature taking its course will disrupt the ecosystem and balances that are natural to our country.

    Sadly, I know house sparrows and Eurasian tree sparrows are on a decline in their native countries. It’s too bad we can’t take all the ones in North America and send them to their native countries to help replenish their populations there, as they so badly need 🙁

  2. Two things, the first is that I hope that the claim of the longest living sparrow in captivity being 23 hours was a typo. The second, I have had sparrows as house pets. I have hand raised them, rescued them, and trained them. They are amazingly smart little birds, and extremely capable of forming deep bonds with humans. If you name them and teach them their name, they will respond when called. I recently lost the last sparrow of my flock to a stroke. She was 10 years old. The youngest of my sparrows to pass was 4 years old.

  3. I have a pet House Sparrow who is eleven years old. She is the most adorable, sweet, loving, and cuddly little bird. However, I’m aware of their invasive and aggressive status out in the wild. Clearly many species should be not released where they don’t belong. This is not “letting nature take its course” but interfering with it. it’s an unfortunate situation for these birds existing in a place they are not wanted.

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